Bridge Level 2 Agreements

This response convention has two significant advantages and two relatively small disadvantages compared to other responses. The first advantage is that the 2♦ “Drop dead!” -Response immediately draw the attention of the opening provider to the weakness of the partner, while there is plenty of space to find a safe landing ground if the partner`s hand is too weak to go to the game – which is quite common in the real game. The second great advantage is that it immediately communicates to the opening provider the combined high card power of both hands within an HCP and therefore the most likely optimal level to offer (with the condition that one can sometimes go a higher level with a good asset). The first disadvantage is that the weaker hand occasionally declares a contract with an asset that fits into the main costume of the answer. (Note that a transmission after the rebid of 2NT of the opener can correspond to the response with a response of 2♥ or 2♠. Such transfers cannot achieve the goal of making the strong hand the declarative, but they nevertheless help to find such a fit asset.) The second disadvantage is that it consumes a little space for offers when the answering machine has an abnormally strong hand. Nevertheless, the minimum aperture of 22 HCP leaves a maximum of 18 HCP spread over the other three hands. It is quite rare for answering machines to own more than half of them. Indeed, this convention has gained popularity both because of its simplicity (comparable to standard Blackwood) and because of the rarity and relatively low consequences of its disadvantages. In the contractual bridge, a strong offer of two commandments (also known as forced two-commandments[1][2]) is an opening offer of two in one costume, i.e. 2♣, 2♦, 2♥ or 2 ♠. It is a natural imperative that is used to show a hand too strong to open on a plane. Usually in the early days of the bridge, after World War II, most of the experienced players converted to the two more common commandments now weak,[2] kept only 2♣ as a strong opening suit offer, and changed its meaning to artificial and mandatory to keep each costume.

This happened on the basis that the two weak commandments would be much more frequent. In most early bidding systems, the opening of two commandments of a costume meant a very strong hand and were called two strong commandments. [1] [2] Pioneering bridge inventors like Pierre Albarran and David Burnstine[3] have however seen that the frequency of these offers is quite low and that an offer of 2♣ can be used for all strong hands, leaving other offers of openness at other levels (for example.B. two weak commandments). In most natural bridge offering systems, the 2♣ opening offer is used exclusively for hands that are too strong for a single-level opening offer. As a rule, the bid is reserved for hands that are almost strong enough to offer on their own at the level of play, or even stronger. The specific offer requirements vary considerably depending on the system and partnership agreement used. A great advantage of the artificial opening offer of 2♣ for all types of strong hands is that other opening offers on both levels (2♦, 2♥ and 2♠) are available for two weak offers and therefore a lot of possible offers for opponents are eliminated…